By Martin Kelly

OMIGOD – the world has changed. Things are different now. Those crazy kids aren’t reading newspapers, all they do is talk and text on mobiles; they’re always online and you can’t even talk to them any more.

I mean, even Rupert Murdoch reckons the internet is the way to go!

Recent reports, many of which were read online, carried the shocking news that media baron Rupert Murdoch believes newspaper editors must embrace the internet, saying print news executives “sat by and watched” as a generation of digital consumers turned away from print.

He could be talking about travel.

The omnipotent CEO of News Corp cited a recent report by the Carnegie Corp in the United States showing that 44 per cent of respondents between 18 and 34 years old said they use websites at least once a day for news.

In Australia, figures from Nielsen//NetRatings reveal that 13.2 million, or 84%, of people aged 16+ have access to the internet, 50% of users have broadband, most spend 30 minutes a day online, and that travel (like news) is one of the most popular categories with 36% “reach” among users. The vast majority of users are aged between 25 and 54.

Murdoch said that newspapers face a dire future unless the way they gather and deliver news changes dramatically. Otherwise, he said, the steady migration of readers and advertisers to web will continue unabated.

“The trends are against us,” Murdoch told the annual meeting of the American Society of Newspaper Editors. “We’ve been slow to react. We’ve sat by and watched. Unless we awaken to these changes, which are quite different than those five or six years ago, we will, as an industry, be relegated to the status of also-rans.”

So why am I telling you this? Well, replace ‘news’ with ‘traditional travel businesses’ and see what you come up with. Murdoch’s words should resonate with us all because he is simply talking about consumers wanting their product delivered in a different format more suited to the times.

Also, remember, it’s Rupert Murdoch, one of the world’s smartest businessmen, who is saying this. And, while he may be well north of 70, the so-called ‘Dirty Digger’ knows a good thing when he sees it, and it is not too proud to see the error of his ways.

The same applies Kerry Packer who, like his former compatriot, did not become insanely rich by ignoring the bleeding obvious and is set to make another large fortune with the upcoming listing of Seek, the market-leading internet job site.

Murdoch concluded that the future is strong, provided the newspaper industry – like traditional travel businesses – finds the correct balance of product delivery to satisfy a new generation of customers.

“I’m still confident of our future, both in print and via electronic delivery platforms. The data may show that young people aren’t reading newspapers as much as their predecessors, but it doesn’t show they don’t want news. In fact, they want a lot of news, just faster news of a different kind and delivered in a different way.

“And we are uniquely positioned to deliver that news. We have the experience, the brands, the resources, and the know-how to get it done. We have unique content to differentiate ourselves in a world where news is becoming increasingly commoditized. And most importantly, we have a great new partner to help us reach this new consumer — the Internet.

“The challenge, however, is to deliver that news in ways consumers want to receive it. Before we can apply our competitive advantages, we have to free our minds of our prejudices and predispositions, and start thinking like our newest consumers. In short, we have to answer this fundamental question: What do we – a bunch of digital immigrants — need to do to be relevant to the digital natives?”

Ends/ 20 April, 2005.

 

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